Download Epub Ê The Kingdom by the Sea ï 368 pages


Ebook The Kingdom by the Sea

Download Epub Ê The Kingdom by the Sea ï 368 pages ↠ [Read] ➬ The Kingdom by the Sea Author Paul Theroux – Dogsalonbristol.co.uk It was 1982 the summer of the Falkland Islands War and the birth of the royal heir Prince William and the ideal time Theroux found to surprise the British into talking about theResult is a candid funny perceptive and opinionated travelogue of his journey and his finding Theroux manages to make Britain seem like the most dismal country on the planet While he was traveling during the 80s I can definitely say that some of the places he described either aren't that way now or weren't given a fair shake And he seems to seek out the miserable spending mere paragraphs on places like Edinburgh He deliberately avoids castles and anything most travelers would visit While I understand not wanting to make the whole book a tour of castles and museums the things he does instead are generally walking from place to place describing how terribly dismal each place is So it's a very dull readAt best it's outdated at worst it's deliberately misleading without him making the same trip again it's tough to say which it is Clearly the British economy wasn't what it was now when Theroux wrote thisThis might have still been readable if there was humor involved thinking here of Bill Bryson's delightful Notes from a Small Island but there wasn't And there's a difference between Theroux and Bryson while Bryson often writes at length about British eccentricities you still get the sense that he truly loves the country and her people With Theroux you get the increasing sense that he hates all British people for reasons never fully described

The Kingdom by the SeaResult is a candid funny perceptive and opinionated travelogue of his journey and his finding Theroux manages to make Britain seem like the most dismal country on the planet While he was traveling during the 80s I can definitely say that some of the places he described either aren't that way now or weren't given a fair shake And he seems to seek out the miserable spending mere paragraphs on places like Edinburgh He deliberately avoids castles and anything most travelers would visit While I understand not wanting to make the whole book a tour of castles and museums the things he does instead are generally walking from place to place describing how terribly dismal each place is So it's a very dull readAt best it's outdated at worst it's deliberately misleading without him making the same trip again it's tough to say which it is Clearly the British economy wasn't what it was now when Theroux wrote thisThis might have still been readable if there was humor involved thinking here of Bill Bryson's delightful Notes from a Small Island but there wasn't And there's a difference between Theroux and Bryson while Bryson often writes at length about British eccentricities you still get the sense that he truly loves the country and her people With Theroux you get the increasing sense that he hates all British people for reasons never fully described

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Reader ç The Kingdom by the Sea ☆ Paul Theroux

The Kingdom by the Sea ☆ It was 1982 the summer of the Falkland Islands War and the birth of the royal heir Prince Will I struggled to get through this one Theroux came highly recommended by other travel writers Bill Bryson and Rick Steves so I was very disappointed As the uotes below reveal Paul Theroux has a gift for the beautiful turn of phrase and is occasionally insightful However far too much of The Kingdom by the Sea was filled with boring and highly repetitive material I'll boil this down to two key gripes1 Theroux's book follows him on trip around the British coastline He makes a commitment to do no sightseeing no castles no museums Instead he intends to immerse himself in British culture However as a way of describing British culture there are inherent flaws in the logic First this means he avoids major British cities including London Newcastle Manchester Oxbridge etc Missing out on these key cities London means he fails to capture some essential ualities of the UK Second his sight free tour of the coast means he spends most of his time at tacky often dying seaside resorts hardly an accurate depiction of England as a whole In the final chapter he writes a brief amalgam of all the resorts that would have sufficed to represent the rest of the highly repetitive descriptions Theroux's departures from resorts to Liverpool Belfast Ulster are among the most interesting parts of the book Reading 100 pages of boring material for 10 pages of valuable insight just isn't worth it2 Jeez what a naive snob this guy is At one point he writes Mine was not the breezy condescension of the traveler but a sense of puzzlement at the state of decay pg 308 I can think of no words to describe his disposition better than breezy condescension Theroux turns up his nose at nearly all forms of mass culture and working class tastes He is highly dismissive of elderly Brits preference for sea shanties and tea cozies Likewise he views railway buffs pleasure riding of dying branch lines as self indulgent and destructive He naively finds the racial epithet wog cute and repeatedly refers to the prevalence of swastikas in graffiti and punk apparel as harmless At times Theroux's elitist disdain for the working class made the text almost unreadable He is far too self absorbed and that makes for highly uninteresting reading much of timeOn the other hand Theroux paints a very powerful portrait of poverty and unemployment in the UK during the Falkland Islands era His descriptions of tribal conflict in Ireland and struggling farmers in Scotland are vivid As a portrait of the British Isles during the early 1980s Theroux's book is compelling but far from complete uotesOn riding the train along the British coastline from Dover to Folkestone It was man's best machine traversing earth's best feature the train tracking in the narrow angle between vertical rock and horizontal waterSpeaking with Mr Crouch an aged worker about the imminent closing of a picturesue train line At Hastings he said 'I'm glad I won't be around to see it' English people of a certain class often said things like this taking a satisfaction in the certainty of death because dying was a way of avoiding the indignity of what they imagined to be a grim futureGoing to the coast was the poor person's way of going abroad standing at the seaside and staring at the ocean It took a little imagination I believed that that these people were fantasizing that they were over there on the watery horizon at sea Reader ç The Kingdom by the Sea ☆ Paul Theroux

Paul Theroux ☆ The Kingdom by the Sea Epub

Paul Theroux ☆ The Kingdom by the Sea Epub Iam and the ideal time Theroux found to surprise the British into talking about themselves The Published not many years after Theroux found success with his wonderful Great Railway Bazaar he wrote this traveling the perimeter of his adopted at the time home of Great Britain Theroux is a wonderful observer open to experience a lover of people and customs but doesn't hold back when he dislikes a landscape that has been ravaged or the ugliness of a town eg Aberdeen Never making advance plans or reservations he set out with a knapsack and one pair of shoes staying at bb's and smaller hotels Making sometimes hilarious observations When he's writing such memoirs he's also a wonderful fiction writer he reminds me of Bill Bryson There are some wonderful moments that struck notes with me for instance an encounter with Jonathan Rabin who told me once during a signing event that he and Theroux were friends and often shared galleys before final publication That particular meeting was over 20 years after the meeting described in this book Theroux also casually throws in the phrase that he didn't want to get duffled a phrase he himself coined in the Railway Bazaar But this book although a time capsule of the '80s when it comes to the current events of the time birth of Prince William the Falkland issue impending railway strike Yorkshire ripper IRA troubles gives the impression that the landscapes he describes from the Cornish and rough Scottish coastlines would remain the same and be familiar today