Free Generation The Seventeenth Century Scientists Who Unraveled the Secrets of Sex Life and Growth kindle Ü eBook 9781596910362 · dogsalonbristol

kindle Generation The Seventeenth Century Scientists Who Unraveled the Secrets of Sex Life and Growth

Free Generation The Seventeenth Century Scientists Who Unraveled the Secrets of Sex Life and Growth kindle Ü eBook 9781596910362 · dogsalonbristol ✓ ❮BOOKS❯ ✺ Generation The Seventeenth Century ScientiFour rival anatomists and their race to answer the age old uestion Where does life come from? Generation is the story of the exciting largely forgotten decade during the seventeenth century when a group of young scientists Jan Swammerdam the son of a Protestant apothecary Nils Stensen also known as Steno a Danish anatomist who first discovered the human tear duct Reinier de Graaf the attractive and brilliant son of a rich and successful Catholic architect and Antoni Leeuwenhoek a self t Kurt laughed at me for checking this book out from the Berkeley Public Library when I don't live in Northern California And he was right to because I'll probably end up paying overdue finesshipping costs enough to buy my own hardcover copy but sometimes I see things in the library and get really excited and can't help myselfI wished that this book was longer It's jovial but clearly written by someone who has a soft spot for embryologydevelopment Whenever I read scientific papers that have nothing to do with what I actually study I often find myself gravitating to stuff about reproduction So while I think that 253 pages is probably enough for most people to read about dissecting ovaries and suirting hot wax into cadaver testicles I wish that there had been chapters that gave details about the recent history of the field rather than compressing the last 300 years into the 8th chapter That being said it's a uick read and has lots of amusing anecdotes about the way the scientific community evolved Amusement aside it does a better job than most of respecting the wisdom and partial correctness of history's debunked hypotheses and it's a good bit of science writing and if you read this far maybe you should read it

Matthew Cobb æ Generation The Seventeenth Century Scientists Who Unraveled the Secrets of Sex Life and Growth text

Aught draper dared to challenge thousands of years of orthodox thinking about where life comes from By meticulous experimentation dissection and observation with the newly invented microscope they showed that like breeds like that all animals come from an egg that there is no such thing as spontaneous generation and that there are millions of tiny wriggling eels in semen However their ultimate inability to fully understand the evidence that was in front of them led to a fatal mistake As It's not fair to the author that I read this very shortly after reading Sam Kean's great science history books The Disappearing Spoon and The Violinist's Thumb While the history is interesting the author isn't the story teller that Kean is His style is dry and a bit stodgy Still I enjoyed the book In the end it gave me much food for thought on how young our scientific journey as humans really is

eBook Ù Generation The Seventeenth Century Scientists Who Unraveled the Secrets of Sex Life and Growth æ Matthew Cobb

Generation The Seventeenth Century Scientists Who Unraveled the Secrets of Sex Life and GrowthA result the final leap in describing the process of reproduction which would ultimately give birth to the science of genetics took nearly two centuries for humanity to achieve Including previously untranslated documents Generation interweaves the personal stories of these scientists against a backdrop of the Dutch Golden Age It is a riveting account of the audacious men who swept away old certainties and provided the foundation for much of our current understanding of the living world This book missed the mark for me Unfortunately the author couldn't keep me as enthralled with the characters and the story as the author should have There are rich characters and a steady plot however the author skips around and loops back in a way that I found to be detrimental to both the character development and the plot I found that it was hard to follow the story because of the anecdotes pertaining to the characters; and I found it hard to connect with the characters because the plot was not straight forwardI liked the book but left unsatisfied because it could have been greatThere is so much good content the book should have really shined

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